Happy National Southern Food Heritage Day!

October 11th is known as National Southern Food Heritage Day, and as many people know, southerners have quite a unique palate. Grits, Cheerwine, sweet tea, and hushpuppies are some of the more well-known southern foods and drinks. Yet, on National Southern Food Heritage Day, people throughout the South celebrate the dishes and treats that originated in our area, including the ones below.

  • King Cake: This special cake is a Mardi Gras tradition and not just in New Orleans. First appearing in 1870 and arriving in New Orleans from France, the king cake is a ring-shaped dessert topped with sugar and icing, in the colors of green, purple, and yellow. It is usually eaten on Fat Tuesday. Hidden inside the cake is a plastic baby doll. The person who finds it is “King for the Day” and is supposed to purchase next year’s cake or host a Fat Tuesday party. In addition, the baby doll symbolizes Jesus being visited by the three wise men on January 6th, which is also known as Holy Day, Epiphany, and the Twelfth Night.
  • Fried Foods(which can include any type of food): The South is known for fried green tomatoes, fried okra, fried fish, and just about fried anything. These battered delicacies come in a variety of different ways and can be made spicy. Other foods I have seen fried are butter, Oreos, and doughnuts. I would recommend trying these at your own discretion.
  • Pimento Cheese: According to Serious Eats website, pimento cheese originated in the 1870s with New York farmers. These New Yorkers started creating cream cheese, and Spain began sending canned red peppers or pimentos to the United States. In 1908, the two items appeared together in a Good Housekeeping recipe. Afterwards, the mixture became a hit, especially in the South. As a matter of fact, farmers in Georgia grew red peppers and sent them throughout the United States, adding to the craze. Over time, pimento cheese, which is also known as the “caviar of the South,” became a staple for many people below the Mason Dixon line. It is a mixture of pimentos, cream cheese, grated cheese, mayonnaise, peppers, and more. Pimento cheese is eaten on sandwiches, crackers, chips, or even on cheeseburgers.
  • Hummingbird Cake: This is another cake that is a tradition for many events. Ingredients include pineapple, banana, spices, pecans, and a cream cheese frosting. As for the hummingbird cake name, its history actually comes from Jamaica. Also known as the Doctor Bird Cake, this dessert is named after Jamaica’s national bird. It came to the United States in 1978 when it was printed in Southern Living with the recipe being written by L.H. Wiggins. Later that year, the cake won the Favorite Cake Award at the Kentucky State Fair. In 1990, Southern Living named the hummingbird cake its favorite recipe and the most requested recipe in the magazine’s history.
  • Boiled Peanuts: Remember the buckets of peanuts at Sagebrush Steakhouse or Texas Roadhouse? One can guess that these peanuts were boiled. Mainly popular in Georgia, boiled peanuts are a classic snack at baseball games, roadside stands, and restaurants. Historians believe this treat started in the Civil War after Union General William T. Sherman’s troops marched through Georgia. After the march, the South was depleted of resources and supplies for their troops. Peanuts became a main source of food, and when boiled over a fire with salt, soldiers discovered that the boiled peanuts would last up to seven days in their packs. Once the war ended, the love for boiled peanuts remained and continues to grow to this day.
  • Cheese Straws: Similar to breadsticks, cheese straws are the perfect southern appetizer and snack. Mainly consisting of flour, cheese, butter, and cayenne pepper, no one quite knows how cheese straws came to be, but some say it was created by a cook who mixed leftover biscuit dough and cheese together. Let’s just say no matter how this snack was invented, southerners are glad it was.
  • Charm Cakes: A Victorian-era tradition quickly grabbed the hearts of southerners and found its way into Southern weddings. Within charm cakes, little charms with significant meanings are attached to ribbon and hidden inside the cake. During a bridal shower, rehearsal dinner, or the actual wedding, each bridesmaid pulls out a charm. For example, the ring means you are the next to marry, seashell stands for eternal beauty, and a moon stands for opportunity.

Food is part of the South’s history and every family’s heritage. These timeless dishes are ones that most people in the South truly love and will continue to share with future generations.

Advertisements

Simply Southern Hush Puppies

SFS_Hush_Puppies-2

Hush puppies – one of my favorite Southern foods! Now, you can make them yourself using this simple recipe!

Ingredients: 

3/4 cup self rising flour
1 cup self rising corn meal (not mix)
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1 small onion, finely minced 
1 pinch garlic powder
1 pinch onion powder
1 pinch old bay seasoning
1 Tbsp sugar
3/4 to 1 cup buttermilk
Canola oil for frying

Directions:

1. In a large mixing bowl, mix together flour and cornmeal. Add egg, onion and spices. Add buttermilk and stir with fork just until blended. Mixture should be farily stiff. Add a little bit more buttermilk, if necessary.
2. Heat oil in deep fryer to 375 degrees. Drop dough by teaspoons into hot oil and fry until hush puppies rise to the top and are golden brown. Remove from fryer and drain on paper towels.
Enjoy!
xoxo,
Megan

Always Be Prepared when Severe Weather Hits

You hear the weather reports. You see others rushing to the store and grabbing milk, shovels, and extra water. Severe weather can strike throughout the entire year, with different seasons bringing various types of storms. Sometimes we are given notice well in advance of an approaching weather event; other times, it is only a few days. Anticipating emergency weather is stressful enough, but having to prepare for it, as well, can be overwhelming. Stay one step ahead of the game and keep supplies on hand for severe weather. Don’t know what you need and when? I’ve got all the details.

The Internet has a plethora of information on how to handle weather and emergency events. Some of the most suggested essentials to have ready include:

  • Tub, bag, or storage area for your supplies that should be easily accessible. Place a list of items within the container on top for easy reference;
  • Water—it is suggested to have one gallon of water per person per day;
  • Food—have non-perishable items for at least a week;
  • Battery-powered or hand-crank weather radio and an NOAA weather radio;
  • Flashlights with extra batteries;
  • First Aid kit and emergency reference information, such as a First-Aid book;
  • Extra batteries for all sizes;
  • Whistle to signal for help;
  • Dust masks—these masks help with protecting yourself from contaminated air and damaged housing;
  • Moist towelettes;
  • Garbage bags and ties;
  • Tissues and toilet paper;
  • Wrench or pliers—the tools can be used to turn off utilities if needed;
  • Manual can opener;
  • Local maps—because sometimes a GPS doesn’t work when a disaster occurs;
  • A charged cell phone with chargers and a backup battery;
  • Prescription and non-prescription medications;
  • Glasses and contact lens solution;
  • Infant formula or food;
  • Extra pet food and water;
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person in your family;
  • Extra clothing for everyone in your house. Make sure the items are appropriate for the climate and weather. Also, don’t forget about rain gear;
  • Fire extinguisher;
  • Personal hygiene items;
  • Paper plates, cups, and plastic utensils;
  • Candles and matches in a waterproof container;
  • Important documents;
  • Plastic sheeting and duct tape, in case you need to create a wall;
  • Cash—hidden in a secret place until needed;
  • Winter shovels and gear;
  • Books, cards, and games to help take your mind off things.

When it comes to important documents, this paperwork should be stored in a water- and fireproof container. The documents in that box should be vital records, medical documentation, financial and legal information, emergency contact numbers, and personal items. Examples are listed below:

  • Birth, marriage, and divorce certificates, including anything needed for adoption or child custody papers;
  • Passport;
  • Drivers’ licenses;
  • Social security cards;
  • Pet ownership papers and identification tags;
  • Housing agreements;
  • Vehicle documents;
  • Financial obligations, such as bills, loans, etc.;
  • Account information;
  • Living wills;
  • Sources of income;
  • Insurance policies;
  • List of medications, immunizations, allergies, and prescriptions for all family members and pets;
  • Medical power of attorney information;
  • Contact numbers for medical specialists, employers, churches, social service providers, insurance companies, repair services, and aid agencies, such as the Red Cross;
  • Irreplaceable family mementos, such as photos, keepsakes, artwork, and jewelry.

The items listed above are universal for any type of situation, from a major snowstorm, hurricane, tornado, etc. In addition, it is important to have a plan about what to do, where to go, etc. That way your family will know what to expect—for example, if you are stuck inside your house without power for a few days or flooding occurs. Of course, these are just suggestions and you can narrow down the supplies to what are mostly needed for the normal weather events in your area. For example, if you live on the coast, you probably don’t need the majority of supplies needed for a snowstorm but will need supplies for a hurricane.

For whatever weather event comes your way at any point in the year, it is important to be prepared with a severe weather kit. Make sure everyone in your family knows where it is located and the items inside. You’ll be thankful that you are ready when a storm hits.

xoxo,

Megan

12 Thoughts from a Southerner

Image result for north carolina

Growing up in North Carolina can be described as summers spent outside, fall days at the county fair, and a winter snowfall once or twice a year. In my opinion, it was a privilege to grow up in the Tarheel state and the South. This area of the United States is special for multiple reasons. It is more than history, food, and traditions. Growing up Southern means you learn to always treasure those around you, even if you don’t know them, to live justly, and value life’s little lessons, such as the ones below.

1: Respect for elders is one of the most important things.

2: Also, respect for your momma and daddy is crucial.

3: Almost every sentence should include a “ma’am” or “sir.”

4: It is better to overdress for any occasion. (Football games, church, you name it-overdress.)

5: Handwritten letters don’t go out of style.

6: Your family will always support you and will always be the most important thing in your life.

7: In the summer, curfews are dictated by lightning bugs.

8: Southern food is the best. You will learn how to cook your grandma’s recipes by the time you are 20.

9: There is no need to be in a rush for everything.

10: Southern hospitality is a way of life that you will master by the time you are also 20.

11: School is canceled with the first flakes of snow.

12: You wouldn’t want to grow up anywhere else but in the South.

xoxo,

Megan

A Recipe for #SharkWeek: Tasty Shark Poke Cake

Today’s shark-related post is all about food. This Shark Poke Cake recipe is adapted from delish.com and is delicious to eat. Plus, you can turn the recipe into a cupcake version. Just use a cupcake pan instead of a cake pan, as well as, one doughnut and fin per cupcake. Remember to also adjust the needed number of ingredients for a dozen or so cupcakes. For example, you’ll need 12 fruit roll-ups, not one.
Enjoy!
Ingredients:
  • 1 box vanilla cake mix plus ingredients for cake mix
  • 1 1/2 cups white chocolate chips, melted
  • Blue food coloring
  • Black food coloring
  • 1 strawberry fruit roll-up
  • 3 mini powdered sugar doughnuts
  • 2 cups marshmallow Fluff
  • 1 teaspoon water
  • 3 cups whipped topping

Directions: 

  1. Preheat oven to 350º and grease baking pan. Set aside.
  2. Prepare cake mix according to the box directions. Add a few drops of blue food coloring and stir together. (The cake will resemble the ocean.) Bake until done, about 25 minutes. Once cool, poke holes all over the cake.
  3. Combine the marshmallow fluff and water. Microwave for about 10 seconds. Pour the mixture all over the cake, making sure the holes are filled.
  4. In another bowl, add 5 drops of the blue food coloring to the whipped topping. Fold together. Frost the cake with the icing and decorate with shark fins and life preservers.

To make the shark fin decorations, mix the melted white chocolate with a few drops of the black food coloring. Using a piping bag or sandwich bag with a hole, pipe fin shapes (similar to triangles) onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet and freeze until hard. Once frozen, add a drop of marshmallow fluff onto the bottom of the fins and place on the cake’s icing.

To make the life preservers, cut the fruit roll up into 3-inch long pieces. Then, each piece again into four pieces. Wrap four strips around a powdered doughnut and secure with the marshmallow fluff.

xoxo,

Megan

The Meanings Behind the Names of North Carolina Famous Cities

FW112-HistoryOfNCNames

We know their names by heart and everything about them, but we don’t truly know their meanings. Wonder what I’m talking about? The names of famous North Carolina cities. Have you ever thought about why Raleigh is named Raleigh? Or why Wilmington is called just that? Well, sit back and read below for the history behind the names of famous North Carolina cities.

Winston-Salem: 

Let’s start with our hometown – Winston-Salem. Originally, the Camel City was two towns: Winston and Salem. The name Winston comes from local Revolutionary War hero, Joseph Winston. Until 1851, the area was known as “the county town” for being the county seat for the town of Salem in the newly formed Forsyth County. As for Salem, it bears its name from “Shalom” meaning peace. It was chosen by Count Zinzendorf, a patron of the Moravian town.

Raleigh: 

North Carolina’s capital city, Raleigh, is the second largest city in the state. The City of Oaks is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in current Dare County. In 1584, Queen Elizabeth gave Raleigh a royal charter to explore and colonize land in the New World. His first attempt at establishing a settlement was known as the Roanoke Colony (the Lost Colony). Three years later, he returned and tried again to reestablish a settlement on Roanoke Island.

Greensboro: 

Formerly spelled Greensborough, Greensboro is the 3rdlargest city in the state. The city gained its current name after the Revolutionary War. Major General Nathanael Greene was an American commander at the Battle of Guilford Court House on March 15, 1781. The battle was a British win, but Greene’s troops inflicted many casualties on British General Cornwallis’ army. Before 1781, the residents of Greensboro were Quakers from Pennsylvania. In 1750, they arrived in Capefair, the area now known as Greensboro. Quickly, more people came to the settlement, making it the most important Quaker community in North Carolina during that time.

Wilmington:

An important port city for various periods in history, Wilmington is currently known for being the Hollywood of the East Coast, its one-mile-long Riverwalk, and the coastal arena it provides people. The city was settled by English colonists and named after Spencer Compton, the 1stEarl of Wilmington. Compton was a British Whig statesman and is considered to be Britain’s second Prime Minister from 1742 to 1743. As for the area, the settlement was built in September 1732 on land owned by John Watson, and was founded by the first royal governor, George Burrington. Before deciding on the name Wilmington, the city was called “New Carthage,” “New Liverpool,” and then “New Town (Newton).” In 1739 – 1740, the town was incorporated under the new name, “Wilmington.”

Boone: 

A quick drive up US-421 North will take you to the beautiful city of Boone, North Carolina. The area is famous for the Blue Ridge Mountains, skiing and snow sports, bluegrass music, and of course, Appalachian State University. One can easily guess Boone got its name from American pioneer and explorer, Daniel Boone. According to historians, Boone spent time camping at locations within the present city limits. His nephews, Jesse and Jonathan, were members of Three Forks Baptist Church, the town’s first church, which still stands today.

Charlotte: 

The biggest city in North Carolina, the Queen City, and home of the Carolina Panthers, everyone knows the city of Charlotte, but few know the name’s meaning. It was first settled by Scotch-Irish and Scotch-Irish Presbyterians and German immigrants before the Revolutionary War. Charlotte is named in honor of German princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1761, she became the Queen Consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Seven years later, the town of Charlotte was incorporated. Along with its nickname, the Queen City, the city was often called The Hornet’s Nest, due to British General Cornwallis’ troops occupying the city during the Revolutionary War. Eventually, residents were driven out and Cornwallis wrote that Charlotte was “a hornet’s nest of rebellion.”

Next time you’re in one of these cities, you can show off your skills by testing your travel companions on their knowledge of the meaning of the city’s name.

xoxo,

Megan