My Favorite Children’s Books

Image result for books

For many people, the love of reading starts at a young age, thanks to being introduced to classic children’s books. Growing up, I had multiple novels that I loved to read over and over again. To this day, I still remember those stories and the emotions they brought with them. If you are looking for a new book to share with the little people in your life, take a look at my suggestions below.

The Junie B. Jones series by Barbara Park

Image result for junie b jones books

“My name is Junie B. Jones. The B stands for Beatrice. Except I don’t like Beatrice. I just like B and that’s all.” This classic sentence is the opening to all of Park’s Junie B. Jonesbooks. From 1992 to 2013, this series produced almost 30 books around this fictional 6-year-old, her parents, baby brother Ollie, her grandparents, friends, and Junie B.’s stuffed elephant, Phillip Johnny Bob. The series covers Junie B.’s journey of starting kindergarten in the first book, Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, to making it to first grade.Some of my favorites novels in the series are Junie B. Jones is a Party Animal, Junie B. Jones Has a Peep in Her Pocket, and Junie B. Jones Is a Graduation Girl. If you are looking for a fun-loving book series, written in the voice of a child, for the young ones in your life, Park has the perfect collection. In addition, she has written older books for middle school aged children.

The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

Image result for the outsiders

The book, The Outsiders, is another one of my favorites. It is geared towards middle-school aged children or older, but teaches many valuable lessons. First published in 1967, author S.E. Hinton describes it as a “coming of age” novel. It tells the story of two rival gangs, the working-class “Greasers” and the upper-class “Socs” and is told through the view point of Ponyboy Curtis, a teenager who is part of the “Greasers.” The Outsiders is set in 1965 Oklahoma. What I love about this novel is that it shows society that socio-economic classes and their differences are pointless and they can cause more harm than good. The Outsiders is filled with themes of bridging the gap between the poor and rich, standing up for those who can’t, and the interactions between people. Many students read this novel in school, but if you haven’t, I recommend you do so. Also, fun fact: Hinton starting writing The Outsiders at the age of 15 and was only 18-years-old when the book was published.

There are many classic children’s books out in the world. People have their favorites that they read over and over again. One of the best things, however, is when the love of a children’s book is passed from generation to generation.

xoxo,

Megan

Advertisements

Why T.V. is Rebooting the Classics

FW110-TVShowReboots.jpg

They say the classics never die and that is exactly true when it comes to television shows. There’s Full House, Charmed, Will & Grace, Murphy Brown, and The Odd Couple. What do all these shows have in common? They are all TV series that have been rebooted. Within recent years, there has been a revival of classic television with the majority of the original cast members. However, there is one question that needs answering: why do we love shows so much that, after they have ended, we are excited to see them rebooted?

Recently, I saw an article titled “Before TV ‘Revivals,’ There Were Just Endless Spin-Offs.” In this piece, writer Becky Little describes that revisiting past series is a “timeless feature of television.” Back in the last few decades, spin-offs became big. This concept allows for the networks to still make money on popular shows, but with a new twist and elements of the existing show. For example, from All in the Family came The Jeffersons, Maude, and Good Times. However, throughout history, there have been good and bad spin-offs. When a previous show is reimagined, fans are able to connect once again with their favorite characters and elements of their beloved shows. Today, a reboot is an updated version of a spin-off.

Just like spin-offs, reboots bring back a sense of nostalgia and comfort to viewers. In today’s world, throwbacks (bringing back the past) is a popular trend, so why not create throwback TV shows? In his article, Why Network TV’s Obsession with Reboots Isn’t a Bad Thing,” Josef Adalian describes three reasons why reboots work on major networks. Think about it: most reboots have come back on their original home network, such as NBC and ABC.

First, Adalian states that the goal of network TV is all about establishing relationships between a show and its audience. After all, a show is considered a success if it has high ratings, right? A reboot allows shows to pick up where it ended. Let’s take Fuller House. This reboot of the original show Full House is set in today’s time but follows the lives of now grown-up daughters D.J., Stephanie, and their friend Kimmy, as well as their children. If you loved watching the Tanners in the 1980s, you will probably enjoy seeing what happened to them and how their lives worked out in the 2010s. It is like you are reconnecting with old friends and catching up. According to Adalian, “Returning to the shows that made us comfortable in an earlier time is either an intended or unintended consequence of all these reboots.” Let’s face it – being comfortable is a favored feeling by most people.

In addition, reboots don’t prevent other shows from being produced. While there are multiple reboots coming back to network TV, there are also multiple new series and original ideas. No matter how many revisited shows there are, pilot shows will never stop being produced, because most people like a little bit of the old and a little bit of the new. I’ll admit it – regardless of how much I like a show, sometimes I want to see something unique and a new storyline. With this point, Adalian is telling viewers that the future for reboots isn’t a network takeover. If you aren’t a fan of watching an updated version of a past show, don’t worry. There will always be a handful of new shows to catch your interest.

Lastly, Adalian’s third and final reason: old TV shows aren’t sacred texts and reinterpreting them isn’t sacrilege. Sometimes it can be hard seeing a treasured show taking an opposite approach when being rebooted. However, keep an open mind, because you never know whether or not you’ll like a revival until you see it. Sometimes it is only the concept that is rebooted, or it might be the characters and a completely different storyline. Whatever it may be, know there will be changes, but always give it a try before you judge.

TV reboots are the latest trend, and the list of shows being revisited keeps growing. At this time next year, who knows how many revivals will be around. As for now, let’s just enjoy the TV blast from the past.

xoxo,

Megan