Happy Sunday!

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Blessings for a great week!

xoxo,

Megan

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Are You Lying to Me? The 411 on How to Catch a Liar

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It happens to most people. Every once in a while, during a conversation, you think, “Is this person lying to me?” You then spend unnecessary time going over their words in your head, thinking about whether or not what they said is true. However, sometimes detecting a liar is something that can be easily done in less than five minutes. All you need to look for are certain actions and movements a person does when they are lying. Body language says it all, and I’ve got your tips and tricks for spotting a liar.

  1. According to Dr. Gregory Jantz, in his article “6 Ways to Detect a Liar in Just Seconds,” more than 80 percent of lies go unnoticed. To prevent this from happening, start by asking neutral questions. Listen to how a person responds to questions about the weather, their hobbies, etc. Be attentive to their body language when they are telling the truth by watching their eye movements, stance, and hand positions. This will help you suspect any unusual actions for when they answer questions that are in the so-called “lie zone.” These questions are ones that aren’t rhetorical and require more in-depth responses.
  2. After the neutral questions are complete, begin observing a person’s facial expressions, responses, and body language as a person replies to personal questions. Surprise questions are another way to bring out lies. Most of the time a person pulls their body inward when lying and shrugs their shoulders. Also, they might become squirmy, jiggle their feet, and hide their hands to prevent fidgety fingers. Lastly, look for any hand gestures towards the face. These gestures, along with the other body movements listed above, are signs of distress and dishonesty. Research shows that President Bill Clinton touched his nose 88 times during his Lewinsky testimony.
  3. Watch for any facial changes and microexpressions, which are brief expressions that are used to conceal emotions. Sometimes a person’s face can exhibit a light shade of pink color as if they were flushed, or they may flare nostrils. Other ways to tell include biting their lips, blinking quickly or not at all, and perspiring. Shifts in body language and facial expressions occur during lying because there is an increase in the person’s brain activity.
  4. In the article, “An FBI Agent’s 8 Ways to Spot a Liar,” former FBI agent Justin Bariso states to listen more than you speak, meaning liars will talk more and in more complex sentences to stop the truth from getting out. He suggests being on alert if a person speaks faster, louder, and has a cracking in their voice. All are indications that the person is stressed. Repetitive coughing and clearing of the throat are clues of tension, as well.
  5. Bariso also notes that one should watch as someone says the word “no.” A person might be lying if they do one of these characteristics when answering “no”: looking in a different direction, hesitating, closing their eyes, stretching the word out, and replying in a singsong manner.
  6. Along with paying attention to the way a person speaks, pay attention to what they say. Some signs of a lie are: refusing to give details to short answers or providing too many details, speaking more formally, over-exaggerating or giving numerous compliments, and making contradictions to early parts of a conversation. Also, look for repeated phrases when talking. Sometimes a person will have prepared their answers for expected questions. When caught off-guard, they are more likely to show inconsistencies and stressful behavior.

Unfortunately, almost every person in the world lies at least once in their lives. However, some lies have more negative impacts than others. If you suspect someone is lying to you, use the tips above to decide fact from fiction.

xoxo,

Megan

Why I Am Quitting Doing “More”

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All of my life, I have gone above and beyond on everything I did. Whether it was my job, school, being involved in a dozen different activities, or even reading, exercising, and writing, I was a perfectionist. There was never a limit to how much I would do or how long I would work. However, about a week ago I saw the picture above on Instagram and it made me think, especially #10: forget doing “more.”

Often times, I call myself a “recovering perfectionist.” Since seeing this image, I have tried to put tip #10 to use. Before when I hadn’t completed a task or gotten as far on something I feel as if I should have, I would have been hard on myself. The negative thoughts flooded my head and my self-esteem would fall. But, since I have starting using the “quit doing more: technique, I have discovered that I am happier and more relaxed with a higher self-esteem. It is just one of my many practices for self-care.

You see the key trick to “quit doing more” is to just do your best and take comfort in that. There is no guidebook or rules as to how much a person has to work, the number of activities a person has to be involved with, or how much time one has to spend on a task. Just do your best. There is no shame in not finishing a task in one sitting or not completing a chapter before going to bed. Listen to your mind and body and don’t over do it. Remember, in everything that you do, you are enough and important.

xoxo,

Megan

7 Life Skills Everyone Should Know

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Throughout life, people learn many lessons and skills. At a young age, we learn to walk, talk, read, and write. Most of the time, in early adulthood, we are taught how to balance a checkbook and how to properly do laundry. The list of all the tasks goes on and on, but there are a few that everyone should learn how to do as they become an adult.

  1. Cooking: It doesn’t have to be a five-course meal, but learn how to cook something. Freezer meals and take out only go so far. Get proficient in a few simple, go-to meals for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Plus, you’ll be able to impress your family and friends by cooking them one of your signature dishes. Also, when it comes to cooking, everyone should learn how to cook an egg, how to properly cook meat, and what fruits and vegetables are in season.
  2. Basic Home and Car Repairs: You can save lots of money by teaching yourself how to fix the small home and car problems that occur. If you are unsure how to stop the leaky faucet in the kitchen, unclog the toilet, or how to replace a flat tire, a quick Internet search will show you. A piece of advice for all minor problems, if you think you can, try to fix it yourself before enlisting professional help. Also, if you ever get stuck, either in a pinch or out in the middle of nowhere, you’ll be able to get the job done without having to wait for help to arrive. Lastly, by having an understanding of basic home and car repairs you will have the knowledge to decide whether or not a professional is being fair in price and quality of service. For car repairs, DMV.org is a great resource.
  3. Basic First-Aid: It never hurts to have the ability to perform CPR, bandage a cut, and handle a burn. Always have a first-aid kit, filled with Band-Aids, gauze, alcohol wipes, gloves, and more at home. You never can predict when an injury or emergency will occur. Other first-aid skills you should have are recognizing the signs of a heart attack, stroke, allergic reaction, and a concussion. Check with your local Red Cross, community center, and community colleges to see if they offer classes in first-aid and CPR.
  4. Writing a Resume and Cover Letter: This task can be tough for many people and can be a dreaded one. However, it is a skill everyone needs to learn and is a must when looking for employment. Many employers don’t spend a great deal of time reading resumes and cover letters. These documents need to be well-written, professional, and to the point. Think of it as being your 30-second elevator speech on paper. Community colleges and career centers in your area, as well as, Goodwill, are willing to assist and answer your questions. Also, there are multiple resources online to consult.
  5. Organizing Important Documents and Financial Records: Sometimes I’m guilty of throwing away receipts that might be needed later, especially during tax season. It is important to have documents, such as your birth certificate, social security card, and insurance information, in a safe place that you can easily reach. Also, store any receipts and tax documents in that same spot, as well. You never know when you’ll need something, but this will especially come in handy during tax season. A good way to store these documents is to invest in a fireproof box.
  6. Tasks We Rely on Our Cell Phones to Do: It might be a harsh reality, but sometimes you won’t have internet access or a way to charge your cell phone’s battery. Teach yourself how to read a roadmap, in case GPS is down, learn the phone numbers of close family members, in case you can’t reach your address book, and how to compute simple math equations, without the help of a calculator. Utilizing these skills will help pull you out of difficult times, if needed.
  7. Emergency Preparedness: No one wants to think that they might have to deal with a fire, flood, or tornado during their life, but sadly, some people do. Whether the power goes out or an accident strikes, it is vital to have the knowledge on what you should do and the supplies to stay safe. Part of being prepared for emergencies is having the ability to keep yourself safe. Take all precautions to avoid any unnecessary situations and how to handle the moment.

As a person goes through life, they acquire many skills and lessons that can be useful. Always keep learning something new and you’ll be confident knowing what to do when a situation calls for a specific skill.

xoxo,

Megan

Day 1: An Update

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Back in October, I gave a life update on the new journey I was taking. Now, several months later, I decided it was time to provide you with another update.

Life hasn’t truly gotten easier. In January, we had another health scare with my grandmother. At 84-years-old, she got the flu and pneumonia. Hearing the doctor say “she might become one that succumbs to the flu” scares you to death. The two weeks she was in the hospital was full of emotions and prayer. Thankfully, I’m happy to report she is now 85-years-old and went into her first store since December this past Tuesday. Let me tell you, that woman is as tough as nails.

As for my job with the magazine, due to recent budget cuts, my position was eliminated. Yes, I am sad, because this means a decrease in income each month, but I’m also comforted. I’m comforted in thinking that I’m on the edge of finding my passion and what I am meant to do. You may know that I’ve been in graduate school, getting my teaching degree. This past spring, I have been student-teaching and loved every minute of it. Those students were so inspiring and made me want to come to work every day. Along with teaching, I feel as if I will spend this summer and the months afterward doing more of what I love. God only knows where life will take me and I’m confident in His plans.

During October to December, I healed from the stress of my grandmother’s stroke and grief of my dog’s, Gidget, death. Now, I am using these summer months to heal and find myself. In these past few months, I have been grieving; grieving for things in life I may never have and grieving for things I’ll never have again. My depression and anxiety have taken hits in my daily life. Now, I’m going to heal.

Some say writing things publicly makes your commitment to them stronger. Whether that is true or not, I’m going to share the ways I want to heal. I want to write, I want to design, I want to read, I want to take pictures, I want to paint, and I want to go for walks. Darn it; I want to sit and watch a whole movie without doing anything else. To be honest, I can’t remember when the last time was I did some of the things listed above. Life has been busy, and I’m grateful for being given the opportunity to manage work, student teaching, and school. However, I’m ready to sit, listen, and heal.

“I’m choosing happiness over suffering. I know I am. I’m making space for the unknown future to fill up my life with yet-to-come surprises.” -Elizabeth Gilbert, author of “Eat, Pray, Love.” 

xoxo,

Megan

Link to “Day 1” post: https://metaylor.com/2017/10/06/day-1/ 

 

My 5 Purse Must-Haves

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Earlier this week, I looked inside my purse and noticed a few things that shouldn’t be there. Let’s just say my purse was more of a tote bag. Inside, I had a CVS bag full of items, contacts, medicine, a water bottle, granola bars, a PRAXIS review book, and a notebook. Normally, I don’t carry this much stuff and half of the time I don’t carry a purse at all. However, this moment got me thinking about what I had to have with me when I go out. So, here is my list of my 5 purse must-haves.

  1. Chapstick – usually, the chapstick has a tint of color to it and also serves as lipstick. My lips always stay dry, so having chapstick is a must!
  2. Granola bar – when I get hungry, I can get hangry and develop a headache. This quick snack helps keep my hunger under control between meals.
  3. A pen and notebook – you never know when you’ll have an idea that just needs to be written down.
  4. Coupon organizer – I hate shopping without a coupon. To avoid this, I always make sure I have my coupon organizer in my purse.
  5. Mints or gum – This one might be self-explanatory… 🙂

What’s in your purse?

xoxo,

Megan

Budget Bzzz: Sweet Summertime Savings

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As May is about to come to a close, many people start thinking about summertime. However, for some people, summertime is closely associated with the dollar sign and all the expenses the season involves. There are vacations, camps, air conditioning, and more that makes summer one of the more expensive seasons. According to the managing vice president of Capital One, Shane Holdaway, March is the most expensive month of the year. (Yes, I realize it is May and we are talking about March – but stay with me here.) In an article on Oprah.com, Holdaway states this is because March is an in-between month, between seasons, where people are getting cabin fever and thinking about their summer plans. And with the summer plans, people are spending money. So, now back to May, if you were one of these people, how do you recoup some of that money to put more back into your wallet this summer? Continue reading below to find out.

  • Assess the damage. It can be hard to admit you went on a spending spree and see how much you spent. However, it is necessary. Think about the expenses you have already made or are going to make during the summer and see where you can pare down. Maybe you purchased a suite at the beach and you really don’t need it. See if a friend or family member might be willing to pay you and use the suite for their vacation. Another option is to try to find another family that will go on a beach trip with you and would be willing to split the costs.
  • Get back on track with your budget. Unfortunately, there are just some expenses you won’t be able to recover. Factor them into your budget and rebuild from there. Sometimes it is best to start from scratch with your budgeting. First, write down all of your fixed expenses, such as car payments, utilities, insurance, etc., and then see how much of your income is left over. Stick to your new budget until you have regained what was lost.
  • Create a plan for paying off your debt and big expenses. Let’s face it – a vacation can be expensive. If you under-budgeted and over-spent, create a well-organized repayment plan. Think about the last trip, refigure your budget and see exactly how much money you have to spend. Paying off your debt or big expenses should become a fixed expense. Go on a spending diet and don’t spend money on anything unnecessary until that purchase is paid off.
  • Always, always, always track your spending. Whether you made the purchase months in advance or that day, write it down in whatever method you prefer. This will help prevent a downfall if you accidently forget an expense that was made in March, but the money wasn’t taken out until May.
  • Set a deadline to get back on track. Summer doesn’t have to be a time to lose money. It can be a time to gain it. For example, create a deadline and commit to it for reorganizing your spending and paying off summer expenses. This can be at the beginning, middle, or end of summer. Whatever works for you.
  • See what went wrong. To be honest, something went wrong somewhere in your budgeting method for some expenses to slip through. Determine how that happened. Maybe it was an impulse expense. There is nothing wrong making purchases ahead of time; just make sure you have budgeted them in and keep track of them.

Summertime can be a time to make memories with your loved ones. But, it can also be a time to save money and get back on track after the summer expenses have been made.

xoxo,

Megan

My Mental Health Self-Care

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May is Mental Health Awareness month. As someone who struggles with anxiety and depression on a daily basis, I am a little ashamed I haven’t written about the topic this month until now.

For the past week or two, my anxiety and depression have run rampant. I have felt like crying for most of the days, ate very little, and wanted to spend the majority of my time sleeping. There have been some recent events in my life that brought on this heavy onset. However, good or bad, I still have to manage my mental health every day, and I have a few ways to help me.

  • Dancing to fun music. My current jam? Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance with Somebody.”
  • Yoga at night to calm music.
  • Taking a bath and just relaxing.
  • Deep breathing.
  • Taking a long drive or walk to clear my mind.
  • Doing an at-home spa treatment, such as a face mask, pedicure, etc.
  • Writing long and honestly.
  • Reading curled up with multiple blankets on top of me.
  • Cleaning and organizing.

Honestly, May has been a month for my mental health. I’ve had my ups and downs, smiles and tears. But, there is one thing for sure, the tips above help me maintain it, and I hope by sharing them, they help you too!

Don’t ever be ashamed to admit you have depression, anxiety, bipolar disease, or another mental illness. There is no guilt in asking for help when you need it. After all, we are in this together!

xoxo,

Megan